• Aurora

    Science Fiction has long been the domain of "big idea" novels and Aurora, by Kim Stanley Robinson—an author well-known for "big idea" novels—is no exception. Robinson is famous for his explorations of ecological themes such as sustainability and the relationship between nature and culture. In Aurora, he takes us into space in order to show us a fundamental truth about life on Earth. . . .

  • March Books

    March was a little light, as far as adventure books, go. Really light, in fact. I only have two. But they both look excellent. The Gutsy Girl by Caroline Paul is a book I wish I'd had as a young soon-to-be adventurer. As for Delilah Dirk and the King's Shilling, I ran out and bought that one the day it came out. I'm a huge fan of the first book in Tony Cliff's series, I'm excited to read the second. . . .

  • February Books

    Really, all the books here stood out to me as books I'd love to read. Elizabeth Marshall Thomas's memoir sounds fascinating. I still have my copy of her book The Harmless People which I read in a previous life as an anthropology student. The Boiling River, Wild By Nature, and Walking the Nile sound like true, old school, amazing adventures. And the fiction, one for older audiences and one for younger, look like the kind of stories that sweep you in, hold on tight, and possibly break your heart. . . .

  • The Odyssey

    Ever since I had to read Christa Wolf's Cassandra in college, I've been fascinated with the Trojan War and Homer's Iliad. I've read all sorts of books that have to do with the Trojan War, from the Iliad itself to Margaret George's Helen of Troy to Madeline Miller's The Song of Achilles. And there are many more that I still want to read. But, despite all of that, I have never felt the same level of fascination for Homer's Odyssey. . . .

  • November-December-January Books

    I have completely neglected this blog for the last few months. But now I'm back and I have a list of great adventure books that have come out over the last few months.

    There are a few biographies and books for younger readers on this list. A couple of them concerned forced adventures, journeys endured rather than enjoyed. This is an important aspect of adventure writing that often gets overlooked. Not all adventures are positive. The Lightless Sky is about a boy who is a refugee from Afghanistan and his escape from that country and the danger that faced him there.

    There are also several books for younger readers. I'm particularly interested in The Fox and the Star and Anna and the Swallow Man.

    . . .